Earn $100 for every referral! #cargobike #cargobikelovers #babboe #Ilovecycling

We are providing our former and current customers to get a $100 refund for every neighbour, friend, shop owner or person who is buying a bike thanks to your referral. That’s right, for every referral! So your cargo bike can even become a free cargo bike.

For more details, go to https://myamsterdambike.com/cargobikes/

How bike friendly is your city?

How bike friendly is your city? According to CNN, the dutch city of Utrecht is the most bike friendly city in the world (50% of all journeys take place by bike). We are delighted to see that many mayors in the USA are creating a more bike friendly city. Dutch local governments welcome anyone to show how they are doing it!

Cargo Bikes Are the New Ice Cream Truck

Ice Cargo Bike

Cargo Bikes Are the New Ice Cream Truck

Oswalds Isbar
If you’re a regular reader of Copenhagenize, you’ve probably seen us blog a photo or two of cargo bike vendors. The ice cream bar is, hands down, one of my favorite cargo bikes to see cruising around town.

With bicycle culture, and now cargo bike culture, emerging around the world it’s refreshing to see examples from cities that aren’t Amsterdam or Copenhagen. Here’s one straight out of Winnipeg, Canada: The Dickie Dee Ice Cream company.

Having been to wonderful wintry Winnipeg recently for the Kickstand Sessions it’s hard to imagine ever getting a hankering for an eskimo pie or a popsicle. Nevertheless, after being founded in 1959, Dickie Dee rode their way to the top – becoming one of the largest vending companies in North America – selling creamsicles and ice cream sandwiches straight from the front of their fiberglass cooler box cargo bikes.

Here’s to hoping we hear a few more of those handle bar bells jingling around town.

This article is from: www.copenhagenize.com

Cargo Bikes for Sale – Earn $100 for every referral!

MyAmsterdamBike

Dear customer,

Cargo Bikes and the environment

Our Dutch cargo bikes are giving many families in the United States a wonderful feeling when making trips on the bike with their kids or pets. We know how important it is to get people on bikes and out of their car to create a healthy environment. Since many clients have already offered us to support in promoting the cargo bike, we would like to offer you a new way to contribute to this greater cause. In addition, we provide you a possibility to reduce the cost of your own cargo bike.

Our OFFER

We are providing our former and current customers to get a $100 refund for every neighbour, friend, shop owner or person who is buying a bike thanks to your referral. That’s right, for every referral! So your cargo bike can even become a free cargo bike.

How does it work?

We keep it simple. Just let the person order a bike online and mention your referral! They can add your name and delivery address in the notes section during the ordering process. Alternatively, they can also send an email to us with this information after the order was placed. Once we have shipped the order, we provide your $100 refund per bike via Paypal to your bank account. 

How can we assist you?

To assist you in promotion, we can send you cargo bike stickers for your cargo bike. You can also share this message to all your friends you can post this message on facebook or any other networking site.

Quite amazing, right? We are looking forward to stay connected. Happy riding!

With warmest regards,

the MyAmsterdamBike Team

 

Babboe Cargo Bike Sale

CARGO BIKE SALE

CARGO BIKE FOR SALE -The Babboe cargo bike is a combined effort of a number of Dutch parents who wanted to have a cargo bike, but thought they were too expensive. As a result, they decided to develop their own top quality, yet affordable, cargo bike. The first Babboe cargo bikes were produced and sold in 2007 in the Netherlands. We have listened carefully to other parents and customers, and we are constantly on the lookout for product improvements and new (accessory) ideas. In Holland, Denmark and several other European countries many parents and dog lovers have a trendy ‘bakfiets’ to get around easily and safely In the Netherlands over 20,000 Babboe bikes have been sold and the Babboe is now the number one selling quality AND budget cargo bike. Every trendy family has one.

We took our own ‘bakfiets’ from the Netherlands. This is the Dutch cargobike that most parents in The Netherlands use to bring their children to daycare, school, swim classes, playground, grocery or just to enjoy being outside. We loved cycling in Somerville and Boston on this cargo trike. We could get around easily and safely with our kids, instead of always have to take the car or walk. We wanted other people to have this same wonderful feeling on a sunny day. And don’t worry about hills, it has 7 gears! We know how important it is for a city to get people on bikes and out of the car. This helps create a green city and a more healthy environment. The team at myamsterdambike.com thinks this wonderful bike contributes to this greater cause.  And at the same time you can transport your children, pets or groceries safely!

Less Car more go : Support Cargo Bike Movie on Kickstarter!

The Project:

In early 2011, almost three years before the Wall Street Journal dubbed cargo bikes “the New Station Wagon,” filmmaker Liz Canning began making LESS CAR MORE GO. The project is a crowdsourced documentary on the past, present and future of the cargo bike movement, co-directed by over 100 cargo cyclists. A rapidly growing online network of bike lovers from all over the world has shared hours of video footage capturing how cargo bikes change lives. The number, quality and content of submissions to LESS CAR MORE GO is a stunning testament to the power of bicycles, community and art. And we’ve only just begun!

By interweaving Co-Directors’ footage with interviews Liz has shot with riders, designers, shop owners, advocates and pioneers, LESS CAR MORE GO will tell the tale of the cargo bike, from the original bakfiets and rickshaws in Europe and Asia, to the birth of the Longtail in Australia and Nicaragua, through the year 2014 when sales are doubling and tripling annually, and the global cargo bike culture is exploding!

Furthermore, the collectively illustrated story of the cargo bike boom will be framed by the parallel story of the synergistic LESS CAR MORE GO project. Our goal is to produce an authentic, collaborative document of a cultural revolution in progress: a tribute to the potential of teamwork, bikes and the internet.

READ MORE

Families Ditch Cars for Cargo Bikes – NY Times

Family Cargo Bikes

 

Dave Hoverman and his wife, Abby Smith, in Berkeley, Calif., with their cargo bike, which can hold all four children. CreditJason Henry for The New York Times

When Dave Hoverman, 38, a business strategy consultant in Berkeley, Calif., goes to Costco on the weekends, he ditches his Audi Q7 and instead loads his four children into a Cetma cargo bike with a trailer hitched to the rear.

“We do all sorts of errands on the bike,” Mr. Hoverman said. “We try not to get in the car all weekend.”

Mr. Hoverman is among a growing contingent of eco-minded and health-conscious urban parents who are leaving their car keys at home and relying on high-capacity cargo bikes for family transportation.

Cargo bikes initially catered to the “hard-core D.I.Y. crowd — people who wanted to carry around really large objects like surfboards or big speakers or kayaks,” said Evan Lovett-Harris, the marketing director for Xtracycle, a company in Oakland, Calif., that introduced its first family-oriented cargo model, the EdgeRunner, in 2012. Cargo bikes, he said, now account for the largest proportion of the company’s sales.

“When we first started selling these bikes 15 years ago, we were the total freako weirdos,” said Ross Evans, the company’s founder. “Back then, a basket on your handlebars was considered fringe.”

These days, cargo bikes are no longer a novelty: They are cropping up not just in the expected West Coast enclaves like Seattle, Portland and the Bay Area, but in cities like New Haven, Tucson and Dallas. “It used to be that if I saw somebody in Boston on a cargo bike, I probably knew them and probably helped them buy their bicycle,” said Nathan Vierling-Claassen, who has ridden a cargo bike since 2008. “Now that’s no longer the case.”

Cargo bikes are also popular in Washington. Jon Renaut, 37, a software engineer at the Department of Homeland Security, said that he is one of more than a dozen parents at his children’s elementary school who commute to school and work by cargo bike. “There have been only two days this whole school year — when it was really, really snowy out — that we left the bike at home,” Mr. Renaut said. What helps keep his 4- and 6-year-old daughters warm, he said, is to have them face backward while riding.

The popularity of cargo bikes has given rise to more variety. Cargo bikes come in two main types: longtails, which look like a regular bike with a large rack extended over the rear wheel, and the Dutch-style bakfiets, which has a cargo box mounted in front of the handlebars. While longtails are considerably cheaper (a Yuba Mundo starts at $1,300), bakfiets (which start at about $3,000) can generally hold more.

“The thing I love about cargo bikes these days is that there is such an amazing selection,” said Shane MacRhodes, 43, who manages a school transportation program in Eugene, Ore. “People are finding bikes that really fit their lifestyle. Some people like the sturdiness of a Yuba Mundo, and some people like the sporty zippy ones. It’s almost like the S.U.V. versus the sports wagon.”

Cargo bikes are making inroads into New York, too. It is not unusual to see them parked outside Whole Foods in Gowanus, Brooklyn, or Union Market in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn.

Joe Nocella, who owns 718 Cyclery, a bicycle shop in Gowanus, joined the bandwagon last year and expanded his cargo bike selection. “Our shop was up 21 percent over the year before,” he said, “and a good chunk of that was from our focus on cargo bikes.”

“It’s such a great transaction because here’s this family that’s ditching the car and transforming itself, and you get to be a part of that,” he said. “I love when the kids come in and jump all over the bikes.” (When parents show up without children, he lets them test-ride bikes with sandbags.)

Manuel Toscano, 42, a design consultant who lives in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, commutes to his son’s preschool in Chinatown and his job in TriBeCa on a Bullitt bicycle. “Every time we tried to take the kid into the subway, it was an ordeal,” he said. “People don’t move or let you sit when you have a kid.”

“We finally decided we’d had enough,” he said. “The only sustainable way to have kids here is not to get in the subway.”

Biking in New York has its share of challenges. “New York is not an easy place to have a family, and it’s not an easy place to have a cargo bike,” Mr. Toscano said. The bike-path approach to the Manhattan Bridge, he said, is not for the faint of calf muscle, and the bridge’s narrow entrances are difficult to navigate.

“The other challenge is where to put my bike,” he said. “I garage mine, and they charge me the same as any other bicycle: $38 a month plus tax, even though it’s longer than a Smart car.”